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PAT Testing

PAT Testing Examples

Depending on the equipment’s Class, several tests are performed during PAT Testing. PAT testing for appliances differs slightly from PAT testing for power cords. This article examines some PAT Testing scenarios.

The appliance will immediately fail if it does not have a rating plate. The tester will be unable to determine the appliance’s Class, the amount of power it consumes, and any approval requirements to which it was produced due to the lack of a rating plate.

A double box sign is used to identify Class II appliances. In this case, just the Insulation Resistance test is conducted during PAT testing.

On appliances without the double box indication, the Earth Continuity and Insulation Resistance tests must be completed during PAT testing. Clipping the Earth Test led to a metal point is simple if the item is housed in metal, such as an electric stove or a washing machine. The metal appliances in this category are classified as Class I.

Class I appliances are totally encased in plastic. Because there is no Earth Point to clip onto, the earth continuity test cannot be done on these appliances. In this case, only the Insulation Resistance test is required while doing PAT testing. It’s crucial to keep meticulous records of why the earth continuity test was skipped.

During PAT testing, power cords such as Computer IEC cables or mains extension leads must pass three tests. The three tests are Earth Continuity, Insulation Resistance, and Polarity. The final check ensures that the Live and Neutral wires are properly connected.

On two-core power cords, there is no earth. They’re designed for Class II machines. They are likewise unaffected by polarity and can be inserted in any direction. In most circumstances, a visual inspection is all that is required.

An illustration of a test

At this stage, looking at some test cases will be good. The numerous types of equipment available are depicted here.

Examination for Class II

A drill’s rating plate verifies that it was built to Class II standards. To put it another way, it uses Double Insulation to provide two layers of protection to the user. We simply need to do the Insulation Resistance Test during PAT testing.

The drill is connected to the PAT tester. The drill’s metal parts are clipped to the test lead. The notion of clipping onto the chuck is brilliant. For the test to be effective, the drill must be turned on. During this test, no mains electricity is provided to the drill, thus there is no chance of the drill turning.

Simply press the Class II button on the PAT tester to complete an Insulation Resistance test. The only item to record on the Equipment Test Record is the PASS or FAIL because this is a Pass/Fail PAT tester. If the PAT tester delivered an actual test value, this is noted.

Electricity is applied to the appliance while using the run or load feature on some PAT testers. It’s critical in this circumstance to ensure that the drill doesn’t start up and jeopardize the person performing the testing.

Inspection of Class I (metal)

The lack of a double box mark on a Burco tea urn’s rating plate indicates that it is a Class I appliance. It uses a mix of insulation and an earth connection to protect the user from electric shock. We must perform the Earth Continuity and Insulation Resistance tests during PAT testing.

The kettle is connected to the PAT tester. The test lead is connected to the heating element of the kettle. Rotate the clip a few times to break through the scaling and create excellent contact with the element if it has a lot of it.

If your kettle has a flat plate, use a screw driver to make a good contact with it.

Make sure the kettle is switched on before starting this test. During this test, there is no mains electricity connected to the kettle, thus there is no chance of the kettle working.

Simply press the Class I button on the PAT tester to execute the Earth Continuity and Insulation Resistance tests. The only item to record on the Equipment Test Record is the PASS or FAIL because this is a pass/fail tester. If the tester supplied an actual test value, this is noted.

On some PAT tests, power is applied to the appliance while using the run or load option. In this case, adding extra water to the kettle will prevent the safety cut-out from turning on.

The Class I (plastic) test is a way of identifying whether or not a substance is recyclable.

The rating plate on an electric fan clearly says that it is Class I equipment. Not only is the double box symbol missing, but there is also no indication that the appliance must be earthed. This means that we must undertake Earth Continuity and Insulation Resistance tests during PAT testing.

The Earth Continuity test, on the other hand, requires clipping onto a metal component of the gadget. Because the fan is completely wrapped in plastic, there is no way to clip this led onto it. This means that if we try to run the appliance, it will fail the Earth Continuity test.

It’s important to remember that, although being Class I and entirely constructed of plastic, this device is far safer than Class I (metal) appliances. If the live wire within the device comes loose, the user is still protected by a layer of plastic insulation.

For treating a Class I (plastic) appliance, the Insulation Resistance test is advised. If this is a PASS, the appliance has been accepted, with the condition that due to the plastic structure, the Earth Continuity test could not be completed.

On the PAT tester, there is a specified Class I (plastic) button. When this button is pressed, just the Insulation Resistance is tested.

The power cords are being put to the test

Many current testers provide a convenient power cord checking feature. Simply put both ends of the cable into the PAT tester and press the Power Cord button to do the test. The tester will complete the Earth Continuity, Insulation Resistance, and Polarity tests, and a PASS or FAIL will be presented.

This test can easily be conducted to mains extension leads using a short (20 to 30 cm) IEC lead. To keep the resistance, it imparts to the measurement as low as possible, a short lead is used.

Both the mains extension lead and the PAT tester are attached to this. When the Power Cord button is hit, the Earth Continuity, Insulation Resistance, and Polarity tests are now conducted, and a PASS or FAIL is displayed. Each of the extension lead’s four sockets must be tested.

By aamritri

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